Monthly Archives: November 2013

A Beginner’s Guide to Heuristic Evaluation (Part 1)

Introduction

In this blog series we’ll explore how heuristic evaluation can help you improve your website through concrete scores and data visualizations. Before we actually teach and walk you through the process of evaluation, we first must learn how to:

  1. Create heuristics
  2. Score your findings
  3. Visualize your scores
  4. Create tasks.
Starting your first website evaluation can be a doozy

I remember starting my first usability audit in the office and I can tell you it was not a walk in the park. Usability best practices were not in my UX toolkit yet and not knowing whether was I right or wrong is the worst part. This is where I realized that a structured review methodology can be a crucial arsenal in your toolkit, especially for first timers. Keeping things formal, organized and consistent will make our evaluation faster and consistent in the future. Luckily there are loads of online resources today that we can use.

 

What is a heuristic evaluation?

A heuristic evaluation is a review methodology or discount usability method for a quick, Continue reading

UX Links for the week ahead (Week 1)

What better way is there to start a Monday morning, than with some world class UX Links.  I’ll be posting a handful every Monday morning, for your inspiration and enjoyment.

1. Smart Transitions in User Experience Design 

2. How Usability Testing Drastically Improved My Clients App

3. Will Future UI Designs Turn Us Into Cyborgs?

4. 4 Essential UX Rules Taught By Eye Tracking Research

5. How To Lower Your Bounce Rate

TableViewRow left offset no support in Titanium

Interested in a hands-on tutorial in Titanium? Building Cross-Platform Apps using Titanium, Alloy, and Appcelerator Cloud Services

While creating the layout for our Mobile App project, there was one Window where the TableViewRows should have a border at the bottom. I thought the separatorColor property would solve it but this was the result in iOS7 simulator: TableViewRowBug
As you can see, there’s a gap on the left side of the Window and the fix for this “bug” on Titanium will be released on December 9 2013, well our project cannot wait for a long time. I saw some hacks from other websites like adding a View inside the TableViewRow, etc.., but none of them really work for me. So I tried to hack it on my own and I managed to solve our problem by inserting a TableViewRow with a different property.

Now this is the result we had:

TableViewRoxFix

The height of the TableViewRow you’ll be inserting should be 1dp and change the backgroundColor to the color you need.

Quick Tips:

Our TableViewRows and the other elements in our project are added dynamically.

Here’s how we did it:

You can’t add a TableViewRow in a TableView, so you should first create an Array e.g var rowArray = []; then push the TableViewRow inside the array e.g rowArray.push(newTableViewRowName); and finally set the TableView data to the rowArray YourTableView.setData(rowArray);

Hope this will help you in some way.

UX Malaysia Conference

Last weekend i was lucky enough to attend the very first UX Malaysia conference.  It’s the first UX conference i’d ever attended; it honestly felt so good to be around some many like minded people.  Hosted in the very impressive Microsoft office in the Petronas towers, the event was sold out.  There were talks from Bram Pitoyo, Jonathan Hirsch, Benjamin Humphrey, Hao Dinh, Mike Lai and Yu-Hsiu.

With UX beginning to take off in countries like Malaysia and the Philippines, it was reassuring to hear the international speakers raise points and arguments that the audience could relate to.  It seems the lone / rockstar UX guys in South East Asia, share similar frustrations in UX design, to the rest of the world. My overall take away from all of the thought provoking talks is:

UX is a not a step in the process; it is a culture that needs to be nurtured.  UX needs great forward thinking designers, who solve problems over and over again.

In Manila we’ve been selling UX short, for far too long. Continue reading